Native Violet - Growing Native Violet


Image from Melbourne Bushfood


    Native Violet is a creeping, evergreen perennial endemic to eastern Australia and the Western Pacific Islands. It grows to about 10cm tall, and spreads widely by trailing stolons that root at the nodes. It can cover large areas when conditions allow it, keep an eye. The leaves are kidney shaped and bright green in colour.

    The purple and white flowers appear mainly in the warmer months. You’ll rarely find it without it’s charming white blossoms.



      Image from Melbourne Bushfood

      Good for:

      - Beginners

      - Pots

      - Garden

      - Ground cover


      Water

      Moist

      Sunlight

      Full sun/part shade

      Size

      10cm tall

      Planting

      Planting Native Violet

      Native Violet is a creeping, evergreen perennial endemic to eastern Australia and the Western Pacific Islands. It grows to about 10cm tall, and spreads widely by trailing stolons that root at the nodes. It can cover large areas when conditions allow it, keep an eye. The leaves are kidney shaped and bright green in colour.


      The purple and white flowers appear mainly in the warmer months. You’ll rarely find it without it’s charming white blossoms.

      Native violet prefers to be in a cool climate and in shade. It likes a soil that is constantly moist, especially during summer peaks. It can be used as a lawn, but Native Violet is not one of the lawns you’ll leave unattended for months. They grow fast and wide. 





      Maintenance

      Watering
      Plant them on well drainage soil. Keep them moist especially during the warmer season. On a shady spot, evaporation will happen less than sunny spot, the soil will dry out much slowly than sunny spot so water more if you prefer to have in a sunny position.


      Fertilizing
      Use slow releasing fertilizer for best results.


      Harvesting


      Native Violet grows fast and wide, keep an eye out as they can be invasive if left unattended. The flower is edible and the seed pod can be pickled like a caper even though it is primarily used as ground cover.


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