4 Indigenous Superfoods that you haven’t eaten (but probably should)


Forget apples and pears, Australia’s native foods have been eaten for a millennium and are jam packed with age-fighting nutrients which will leave you feeling fuller and more Aussie than any pavlova will.

  1. Kangaroo Apple

Picked ripe with a sweet flavour resembling cherry tomatoes and containing undernotes of melon, this yearly perennial grows easily around south-east Australia and is loaded with cold-fighting vitamin C.

The egg-shaped fruits are also packed with phytochemicals which protect against things such as heart disease, stroke and cancer. Eaten for centuries by indigenous people, it has become a staple additive in many native dishes.

2. Yam Daisy

Resembling the European dandelion, all the plant from the bright yellow flowers to the sweet potato-like tuber can be eaten. Almost eradicated by pasturing livestock, the Yam Daisy has been on a bounce back thanks to the decline of the meat industry and the rise of urban spaces (Thanks vegans).

Edible raw with a radish-like texture, or cooked for a coconutty flavour, this diverse plant contains 8 times the nutrients per serving as compared to the common potato. With a nice amount of dietary fibre, your digestive system will say thank you after eating these.

3. Strawberry Gum (Eucalyptus olida)

              Eucalyptus olida or the Strawberry gum is a medium sized tree endemic to the accurately named Tablelands region of NSW. The leaves were chewed by settlers for its sweet berry-like flavour and it wasn’t until recently the microbial gut boosting properties were understood.

Now, essential oils are extracted for perfumery and the leaves are dried and used as a spice to enhance the flavour of fruit salads or other Aussie classics like the pavlova. With sweet fruity notes, it contains shades of cinnamon, strawberry and passionfruit. Definitely a great way to spice up any sweet dish.

4. Finger Lime

              Last on our list of Aussie superfoods is none other than the balloon like Finger Lime. Containing hundreds of sour beads of citrusy goodness, this caviar-like lime is sort after by international restaurants as a beautiful and flavoursome addition to their complex dishes.

Up to 12cm long, and rich in folate, potassium and vitamin E, it is dynamic enough to be used in deserts, sauces and even cocktails. Containing 3 times the amount of Vitamin C of a mandarin, it is undoubtedly a great immune booster.


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